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The Even Scarier Graph for Newspapers (and partly brands)

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Written by on April 11, 2013

Recently, The Atlantic posted the article "This Is the Scariest Statistic About the Newspaper Business Today". In it you can find this graph illustrating the decline of print advertising in relation to the increase in online advertising.

As you can see, the numbers don't look good.

As the Atlantic wrote:

Since 2003, print ads have fallen from $45 billion to $19 billion. Online ads have only grown from $1.2 to $3.3 billion. Stop and think about that gap. The total ten-year increase in digital advertising isn't even enough to overcome the average single-year decline in print ads since 2003. Ugh.

Ugh, indeed!

And yes, this is pretty scary, but this is not the scariest graph of all. There is one even scarier. It's the graph illustrating why this is happening. Let me illustrate it in a very simple way.

The graph illustrates the total advertising market in 1990 (before the internet). As you can see, each newspaper commanded a rather large share of the total market (in the world of scarcity). The internet, which wasn't really around yet, commanded nothing with its multiple sources.

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Thomas Baekdal

Thomas Baekdal

Founder of Baekdal, author, writer, strategic consultant, and new media advocate.

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